Divorce

Forms

Choose the form you need below. You can either download and print the form, or fill it out on your computer, then print it out.

Forms to start the court case for a divorce or to dissolve your registered domestic partnership:

  • Petition - Marriage/Domestic Partnership (Form FL-100)
  • Summons (Form FL-110)
  • Declaration Under Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and
    Enforcement Act (UCCJEA)
    (Form FL-105/GC-120)
    See the instructions for this form.
  • Notice and Acknowledgment of Receipt (Form FL-117)
  • Response - Marriage/Domestic Partnership (Form FL-120)
  • Proof of Service of Summons (Form FL-115)

Proof of Service of Documents Other Than Summons:

  • Proof of Personal Service (Form FL-330)
  • Proof of Service by Mail (Form FL-335)

Check with your court to see if there are any local forms that need to be completed.

When people divorce they have to tell each other and the court everything that they own (assets) and owe (debt). In general, these assets and debts are divided into community and separate property.

  • Get more information on what these two terms mean.
  • If the spouses or partners own property (or have a debt) with a third party, they must list the percentage of each person's ownership or debt.

Choose the form you need below. You can either download and print the file, or fill it out on your computer, then print it out.

Watch "Financial Disclosures in a Divorce, Legal Separation or Annulment."

The four most common forms people use to tell what they own and what they owe:

This form is a cover sheet that lists what is included with the Preliminary Disclosure.
(For the "Declaration Regarding Service" of this form, see below.)

This is a list of assets and debts and the percentage of ownership of property
or responsibility for debts.

NOTE: The more assets you have, the more complicated sorting this out will be. But you can ask for help. Consulting an attorney may be a good idea. There may be "community assets" that you haven't thought about, like pension plans. Fortunately, you can wait until the final Declaration of Disclosure to give the other information asked for on the Schedule of Assets and Debts.

  • Income and Expense Declaration (Form FL-150)
    See the instructions for this form.
    OR
  • Financial Statement Simplified (Form FL-155)
    See the instructions for this form.
  • To help you decide if form FL-150 or form FL-155 is right for you, read an information sheet called "Which Financial Form - FL-150 or FL-155?" (DV-570) in English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean or Vietnamese. Click on the language you need:
  • Declaration of Property (Form FL-160)

If a "Declaration of Property" (form FL-160) was attached to the original Petition, then you must each fill out and attach another copy of the form FL-160. All of the columns are to be filled in to show how much each spouse's or partner's assets are worth and how each of you thinks they should be divided. The court may ask each of you to explain your opinion.This is true unless there is a written agreement between you and your spouse or partner about how to divide your property.

REMEMBER:

  • You must use one copy of the form for community property and debts, and use another copy of the form for separate property and debts.
  • California law says that in most cases the community property must be divided equally. So, the total community property value, minus the community debts, needs to be about equal for each spouse or partner. Otherwise, the judge may not approve the proposed division.

After you have served these disclosure documents, you will need to complete, file and serve this form:

  • Declaration Regarding Service of the Declaration of Disclosure (Form FL-141)
    See the instructions for this form.

Check with your court to see if there are any local forms that need to be completed.

To finish your divorce, you may need these forms:

  • Stipulation and Waiver of Final Declaration of Disclosure (Form FL-144)
  • Property Order Attachment to Findings and Order After Hearing (Form FL-344)
  • Property Order Attachment to Judgment (Form FL-345)
  1. Real Estate: If one spouse/partner got property in the judgment, he or she must sign and deliver a new deed for this real estate. The deed should then be recorded. He or she should consider having an attorney help with this process.
  2. Motor Vehicles: If one spouse/partner got a car in the judgment, he or she must file a Department of Motor Vehicles form to change title to the car.
  3. Retirement Benefits: The Judgment may give one spouse or partner the right to part of the other spouse's or partner's "retirement benefits" in the future. In that case, an additional court order called a Qualified Domestic Relations Order (or "QDRO") must be filed.
    • The QDRO must be approved by both the benefits provider and the judge in order for the spouse or partner to receive those future retirement benefits.
    • This is not a standard court form. Consider getting help from an attorney to file a QDRO.

When a couple separates or divorces, one spouse or partner may need for the other to pay them a certain amount of support money each month. This is called "spousal or partner support," or "alimony."

  • If the couple can agree on the amount of spousal or partner support to be paid, and for how long, they can write down their agreement and get it notarized.
  • If they cannot agree on the amount of spousal or partner support to be paid, and for how long, they can ask the court to decide.

Form for Spousal or Partner Support:

  • Spousal or Family Support Order Attachment (Form FL-343)

Choose the form you need below. You can either download and print the form, or fill it out on your computer, then print it out.

  • Child Support Information and Order Attachment (Form FL-342)
    See the instructions for this form.
  • Spousal or Family Support Order Attachment (Form FL-343)
  • Child Support Case Registry Form (Form FL-191)
  • Notice of Rights and Responsibilities -- Health Care (Form FL-192)
  • Income Withholding for Support (Form FL-195)
    See the instructions for this form in Form FL-196

Choose the form you need below. You can download and print the form. You can also fill it out on your computer, then print it out.

  • Child Custody And Visitation Order Attachment (Form FL-341)
  • Supervised Visitation Order (Form FL-341(A))
    See the instructions for this form.
  • Child Abduction Prevention Orders Attachment (Form FL-341(B))

You could also use these other forms:

  • Children's Holiday Schedule Attachment (Form FL-341(C))
  • Additional Provisions-Physical Custody Attachment (Form FL-341(D))
  • Joint Legal Custody Attachment (Form FL-341(E))
  • Stipulation and Order for Custody and/or Visitation (Form FL-355)
    See the instructions for this form.

Choose the form you need below. You can either download and print the file, or fill it out on your computer, then print it out.

  • Appearance, Stipulations, and Waivers (Form FL-130)
  • Stipulation and Waiver of Final Declaration of Disclosure (Form FL-144)
  • Request to Enter Default (Form FL-165)
  • Declaration for Default or Uncontested Dissolution or Legal Separation (Form FL-170)
  • Judgment (Form FL-180)
  • Notice of Entry of Judgment (Form FL-190)
    See the instructions for this form.
  • Child Custody And Visitation Order Attachment (Form FL-341)
  • Child Support Information and Order Attachment (Form FL-342)
  • Non-Guideline Child Support Findings Attachment (Form FL-342(A))
  • Property Order Attachment to Findings and Order After Hearing (Form FL-344)
  • Property Order Attachment to Judgment (Form FL-345)
  • Stipulation and Order for Custody and/or Visitation (Form FL-355)
    See the instructions for this form.
  • Wage and Earnings Assignment Order (with instructions) (Form FL-435)
    See the instructions for this form.
  • Spousal or Family Support Order Attachment (Form FL-343)
  • Child Support Case Registry Form (Form FL-191)
  • Income Withholding for Support (Form FL-195)
    See the instructions for this form in Form FL-196

Choose the form you need below. You can either download and print the file, or fill it out on your computer, then print it out.

  • Joint Petition for Summary Dissolution of Marriage (Form FL-800)
  • Summary Dissolution Information (Form FL-810)
  • Summary Dissolution Information - in Spanish (Form FL-810S)
  • Request for Judgment, Judgment of Dissolution of Marriage, and Notice of Entry of Judgment (Form FL-820)
  • Notice of Revocation of Petition for Summary Dissolution (Form FL-830)

The Judicial Council of California created a booklet to help people who can use Summary Dissolution to end their marriage. You can download the booklet from the California Courts Website.

If a couple wants to use Summary Dissolution to end their marriage, the judge will expect them to fill out the worksheets from the booklet and attach them to their:

  • Joint Petition for Summary Dissolution of Marriage (Form FL-800)

"Community Property" is property that the couple got during their marriage or domestic partnership. In California, each spouse/partner owns 50% of this property. This is true unless one of them got the property as a gift or inheritance.

Get the Community Property Worksheet.

This worksheet is divided into two sections. There is a black line down the center of the page.

  • On the left, you will put the value of the community property.
  • On the right, you will explain how you will divide the community property.

The information on the left side will help you decide whether you are can use Summary Dissolution. The total value of your community property must be less than $38,000 to use Summary Dissolution.

The information on the right side of the worksheet can help you decide how to divide your property. It will help you prepare your Property Settlement Agreement.

Section A: Bank accounts, retirement funds, cash value of insurance policies, etc.

  • Item: List each account or policy that you opened during the marriage or domestic partnership. If you need more room to list all items, attach a separate sheet of paper.
  • Account No: List partial account numbers of any items listed.
    • NOTE: Once you file your forms, your divorce becomes a public record. Protect yourself. Do not list full account numbers, social security numbers, etc. List just enough information so it is clear to you and your spouse/partner which account it is.
  • Amount: List the cash value of each item listed.
  • SUBTOTAL A: Add the value of each item listed.

On the right side of the double line list how much you will get of each asset and how much your spouse/partner will get.

  • Spouse/Partner A Receives: Write the value of any items spouse/partner A receives.
  • Spouse/Partner B Receives: Write the value of any items spouse/partner B receives.

Section B: Items you own outright.

  • Item: List any furniture, bonds, jewelry, pets, and any other things you got during the marriage/domestic partnership. If you need more room to list all items, you can attach a separate sheet of paper.
  • Fair Market Value: Write in this column the current dollar value of each item listed if you sold it today.
  • SUBTOTAL B: Add the value of each item listed.

On the right side of the double line list how much of each asset you will get and how much your spouse/partner will get.

  • Spouse/Partner A Receives: Write the value of any items spouse/partner A receives.
  • Spouse/Partner B Receives: Write the value of any items spouse/partner B receives

Section C: Items you are buying on credit

  • Item: List anything purchased on credit during the marriage. If you need more room to list all items, you can attach a separate sheet of paper.
  • Fair Market Value: Write the current dollar value of each item listed if you sold it today.
  • Minus Amount Owed: Write how much your spouse/partner and you owe for each item.
  • Net Fair Market Value: Write the value of each item after you subtract the amount owed from the fair market value. For example, if you and your spouse/partner financed a smart phone which is currently worth $300. but you still owe $200, the Net Fair Market Value is $100.
  • SUBTOTAL C: Add the Net Fair Market Value of each item listed.

On the right side of the double line write how much of each asset you will get and how much your spouse/partner will get.

  • Spouse/Partner A Receives: Add the value of all items spouse/partner A receives and write in the total dollar value.
  • Spouse/Partner B Receives: Add the value of all items spouse/partner B receives and write in the total dollar value.

Grand Total value of Community Property:

Add the total of sections A, B, and C. Insert the total number in this field
(A+B+C = Grand Total).

  • Spouse/Partner A Receives: Add the value of all items spouse/partner A receives in sections A, B and C. Then write the total dollar value.
  • Spouse/Partner B Receives: Add the value of all items spouse/partner B receives in sections A, B, and C. Then write the total dollar value.

If the Grand Total value of community property is more than $38,000 you cannot file for Summary Dissolution. You need to get a regular divorce or dissolution of domestic partnership.

If your community property is not more than $38,000, you now need to complete the Worksheets for:

Determining the Value of Separate Property and

Determining and Dividing Community Obligations.

Separate Property is property that you or your spouse/partner had before your marriage or domestic partnership. It is also property that you or your spouse/partner got during the marriage or domestic partnership as an inheritance or gift. It can also be property you or your spouse/partner got after you separated.

Download Separate Property Worksheet

This worksheet will help you decide whether you can use the Summary Dissolution Procedure. The total fair market value of Spouse/Partner A's separate property cannot be more than $38,000. The total fair market value of Spouse/Partner B's separate property cannot be more than $38,000. Do not include the value of your cars in this worksheet.

Section A: Bank accounts, retirement funds, cash value of insurance policies, etc.

  • Item: List any any accounts or policies that were opened before the marriage/domestic partnership or after separation. If you need more room to list all items, you can attach an additional page.
  • Account No: List either the partial account numbers of any items listed.

    NOTE: Once you file your forms, your divorce becomes a public record. Protect yourself. Do not list full account numbers, social security numbers, etc. List just enough information so it is clear to you and your spouse what accounts you mean.
  • A double line is drawn down the middle of the page.
    • On the right of the line, list the current value of each item.
    • If the item is Spouse/Partner A's separate property write its value under "Spouse/Partner A's Property Fair Market Value."
    • If the item is Spouse/Partner B's separate property write its value under "Spouse/Partner B's Property Fair Market Value."

Section B: Items owned outright

  • Item: List any stocks, furniture, tools, interests in businesses, jewelry, etc. either spouse/partner bought before marriage/domestic partnership. Also include anything you or your spouse/partner bought with money earned after you separated. Also list items received as gifts or inheritance. If you need more room to list all items, you can attach an additional page.
  • A double line is drawn down the middle of the page.
    • On the right of the line, write the current dollar value of each item.
    • If the item is Spouse/Partner A's separate property write its value under "Spouse/Partner A's Property Fair Market Value."
    • If the item is Spouse/Partner B's separate property write its value under "Spouse/Partner B's Property Fair Market Value."

Section C: Items being bought on credit

  • Item: List anything that either you or your spouse/partner bought or are in the process of buying on credit after your date of separation. If you need more room to list all items, you can attach an additional page.
  • Fair Market Value: Write how much each item would be worth if you sold it today.
  • Minus What's Owed: Write the balance you or your spouse/partner owe(s) on the item.
  • A double line is drawn down the middle of the page.
    • To the right of this double line write the current dollar value of each item. To get the dollar value, subtract what is owed on the item from the item's current value.
    • If the item is Spouse/Partner A's separate property, write its value under "Spouse/Partner A's Property Fair Market Value."
    • If the item is Spouse/Partner B's separate property, write its value under "Spouse/Partner B's Property Fair Market Value."

Grand totals for Spouse/Partner A and Spouse/Partner B's separate property:

  • Spouse/Partner A's Property Fair Market Value: Add all the numbers listed in this column together and write in the total.
  • Spouse/Partner B's Property Fair Market Value: Add all the numbers listed in this column together and write in the total.

Now you must decide if you are can get a Summary Dissolution.

  • If your separate property is worth more than $38,000 OR if your spouse/partner's separate property is worth more than $38,000, you are not eligible for Summary Dissolution. You need to get a regular divorce.
  • If you and your spouse/partner do not have separate property worth more than $38,000, you need to complete the Worksheet for Determining Community Obligations/ Division of Obligations.

This worksheet is divided into two sections.

  • In the section to the left of the double line, "Worksheet For Determining Community Obligations," list all of the community debts (debts incurred during marriage/domestic partnership).
  • In the section to the right of the double line, "Worksheet For Determining Division of Obligations," you and your spouse/partner need to determine who will pay each debt.

The worksheet breaks down who will be responsible for debts incurred during marriage/domestic partnership so that a fair division of debts can be made. (Do NOT include car loans in this worksheet.)

Download Community Obligations Worksheet

Left Side: Community Obligations

On this side of the worksheet include any debt you took on while you were living together as spouses/partners. List the amount you owe on the items from your Worksheet For Determining Community Property. Then add all other debts and bills including loans, charge accounts, medical bills, and taxes you owe.

  • Item: List anything that either you or your spouse/partner bought on credit or through loans. The items listed must be purchased during your marriage/domestic partnership. If you need more room to list all items, you can attach an additional page.
  • Account Number: Write either the entire or partial account numbers of any items listed.

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Once you file your forms, your divorce becomes a public record.
    This means anyone can view your documents if they go to the court file unit. Protect yourself. Do not list full account numbers, social security numbers, etc. List just enough information so it is clear to you and your spouse/partner what accounts you mean.
  • Amount Owed: Write how much money is owed for the item listed.
  • TOTAL: In this column put your total community debt.
    • If the total debt is more than $6,000, you cannot file for Summary Dissolution. You have to get a regular divorce.
    • If the total debt is $6,000 or less then you can file for Summary Dissolution. Then you need to complete the remaining section of this worksheet.

Right Side: Division of Obligations

A double line is drawn down the middle of the page. To the right of this double line indicate who will pay the balance owed for each item.

  • Spouse/Partner A Will Pay: If the debt will be paid by spouse/partner A, write the amount owed for the debt in this column.
  • Spouse/Partner B Will Pay: If the debt will be paid by spouse/partner B, write the amount owed for the debt in this column.
  • TOTAL: Write in each column how much debt is the spouse/partner A's portion and how much debt is the spouse/partner B's portion.

The judge cannot hear your court case until you have filed your court forms properly. The judge has to be sure that everyone involved in the court case has information about what the other people have filed before he or she can let the case move forward.

To prove to the court that copies of the documents were given to everyone, "Proof of Service" forms are to be filled out and filed with the court.

REMEMBER: YOU CANNOT SERVE YOUR COURT FORMS YOURSELF.

Someone over 18 (for example a friend, relative, or a professional process server) who is not involved in the case in any way must serve the court forms for you.

The person who serves the documents has to complete one Proof of Service form for each person served and return it to you for filing with the court.

Choose the form you need below. You can either download and print the file, or fill it out on your computer, then print it out.

  • Proof of Personal Service (Form FL-330)
  • Proof of Service by Mail (Form FL-335)
  • Proof of Service of Summons (Form FL-115)

In most cases, you have to pay a fee to file papers with the court. The fees are a little different in each county. Usually counties have their fee schedules posted on their court's web site.

For some people who do not earn enough money, the court will say that they do not have to pay the fees. This is called a "fee waiver."

  • Information Sheet on Waiver of Court Fees and Costs (Form FW-001-INFO) .
  • Request to Waive Court Fees (Form FW-001)
  • Request to Waive Additional Court Fees (Form FW-002)
    See the instructions for this form.
  • Order on Court Fee Waiver (Form FW-003)
    See the instructions for this form.
  • Notice: Waiver of Court Fees (Form FW-005)
  • Request for Hearing About Court Fee Waiver Order (Form FW-006)
    See the instructions for this form.
  • Notice on Hearing About Court Fees (Form FW-007)
    See the instructions for this form.
  • Order on Court Fee Waiver After Hearing (Form FW-008)
    See the instructions for this form.
  • Notice to Court of Improved Financial Situation or Settlement (Form FW-010)
    See the instructions for this form.
  • Notice to Appear for Reconsideration of Fee Waiver (Form FW-011)
  • Order on Court Fee Waiver After Reconsideration Hearing (Form FW-012)
    See the instructions for this form.

To learn more about fee waivers please read fee waiver basics.